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Press Release

Not Business as Usual for Las Vegas Air Traffic Controllers Under Shutdown

Published on Fri, Oct 4, 2013 (11:12 a.m.)

Good Afternoon,

NATCA Facility Representative for McCarran Airport Tower is available to do an interview about the impact the government shutdown is having on air traffic control operations at the airport. While air traffic controllers are working, 3,000 aviation safety professionals nationwide, who NATCA represents, have been furloughed. Controllers rely on these support staff as a part of a team to prepare and maintain their working environment; controllers working without back up during the shutdown is akin to surgeons going into operating rooms alone. In addition, air traffic controller training has been stopped, hiring has been frozen, and of the 12,400 controllers working today, 3,000 are eligible to retire with no hires in the pipeline to replace them. This presents long-term problems for the nation's aviation system.

Please call me at 202-220-9813 if you're interested in setting up an interview. Below is a press release we distributed about the shutdown.

NATIONAL AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS ASSOCIATION



October 1, 2013



CONTACT: Sarah Dunn, 315-796-1560





NATCA CONDEMNS GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN



WASHINGTON – The National Air Traffic Controllers Association today condemned the shutdown of the federal government and called on Congress to end it immediately.



As a result of the shutdown, 3,000 of NATCA’s aviation safety professionals, vital to the daily function, maintenance and safety of the National Airspace System (NAS) have been furloughed.



“It is unacceptable that thousands of our aviation safety professionals have been forced to stay home due to partisan posturing in Congress,” said NATCA President Paul Rinaldi. “I implore Congress to reach an agreement to end this shutdown, which is hurtful to our nation’s aviation system, our economy and the American people.”



During the shutdown, air traffic controllers are working without pay, but essential support staff specialists have been furloughed. Rinaldi said this is akin to a surgeon performing an operation without any staff to prep the room, clean the equipment or provide support during the surgery. In addition, controllers who train new hires will be unable to continue much of the training process. This could result in high controller attrition as frustrated trainees fall further behind in the training process. Controller hiring was already frozen due to sequestration.



Below are just a few of the thousands of projects that could be delayed or halted due to the government shutdown and furloughing of aviation safety professionals.



Ø A flight inspection scheduled for Janesville, Wis., Airport has been shut down due to the furlough of key personnel. Without an inspection, the instrument landing system approach into the airport will eventually be declared inoperative. This results in inefficiency for air traffic controllers and pilots, and a reduction in the margin of safety.

Ø Thousands of certification projects performed by NATCA Aircraft Certification Engineers are now suspended.

Ø A halt in the ELD Power Cable Replacement at Dallas Fort Worth Airport (DFW). The cable supplies power to the navigational aids on the diagonal runways at DFW. Construction planned for January will now be delayed for an undetermined amount of time.

Ø A hold on hundreds of Aircraft Certification Office projects. This will result in a delay in the approval of safety related equipment modifications to aircraft going through the certification process.

Ø A stop for work on Airworthiness Directives, NTSB safety recommendations and other vital safety related work performed by Aircraft Certification Engineers. This could delay the issuance and implementation of mandated safety fixes to aircraft.

Ø A delay of all projects affecting surveillance radars that feed the 100 busiest airports in the NAS.

Ø A halt in the development and implementation of navigational aids for a new runway at Fort Lauderdale airport.

Ø A halt on several runway safety projects, including glide slope relocation at Long Beach, Calif.

Ø A delay in major mechanical upgrades scheduled for three air traffic control En Route Centers.

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