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July 31, 2015

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Las Vegas lawmaker says proposed stripper tax could raise millions

Senator Mark A. Manendo of the 77th (2013) Nevada Senatorial District.

Senator Mark A. Manendo of the 77th (2013) Nevada Senatorial District.

Two state Senators introduced bills Monday night that would regulate strip clubs and other live adult entertainment venues.

Sen. Mark Manendo, D-Las Vegas, wants to charge nude entertainment clubs a $10 per customer fee.

His bill, which was introduced Monday, would require the state to deposit those fees into accounts for victims of domestic violence and programs related to domestic violence as well as accounts for compensation of victims of crime.

Any nightclub, bar or restaurant that serves alcohol and offers live nude entertainment or live nude performances would be subject to the fees.

Nude, as defined in the bill, means fully unclothed or “clothed in a manner that leaves uncovered or visible through less than fully opaque clothing any portion of the breasts below the top of the areola of the breasts, if the person is female, or any portion of the genitals or buttocks.”

The business would not have to charge customers the fee but would need to find some mechanism to record daily attendance numbers and pay quarterly the $10 fee for each customer.

Manendo said his main focus is about revenue and that he thinks the bill can raise millions of dollars.

Because the bill raises a new fee, it requires a two-thirds vote of the Legislature to pass into law.

Sen. Barbara Cegavske, R-Las Vegas, also introduced a bill Monday that would regulate adult entertainment venues.

Under penalty of a misdemeanor, her bill would ban anyone less than 21-years-old from performing at such a business.

The bill exempts licensed brothels, but generally applies to any business “which emphasizes

and seeks, through one or more performers, to arouse, appeal to, excite or gratify the lust,

passions or sexual desires of the patrons of the establishment.”

Likewise, the bill defines a performer as an employee who “who seeks to arouse, appeal to, excite or gratify the lust, passions or sexual desires of the patrons of the establishment.”

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