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November 27, 2014

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Utilities scramble to restore power in Pa., Md.

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Matt Rourke / AP

An ice covered tree limb that took out a utility line blocks the path of a firetruck after a winter storm Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014, in Philadelphia. Icy conditions have knocked out power to more than 200,000 electric customers in southeastern Pennsylvania and prompted school and legislative delays as well as speed reductions on major roadways.

Updated Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 | 12:09 p.m.

Winter Weather

Pedestrians make their way through a slushand water at an intersection in New York, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014. Around 6 inches of snow are expected in parts of the metropolitan area on Wednesday. Launch slideshow »
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of people spent a second day without electricity Thursday as utility crews from as far away as Canada and Arkansas scrambled to restore power lost when a heavy coating of ice took down trees and limbs in the mid-Atlantic. Forecasters said a bone-chilling cold would remain in place for days. In Pennsylvania, where most of the outages were located, officials likened the scope of the damage to a hurricane. Some who might not get power back for several days sought warmth — or at least somewhere to recharge their batteries — in shopping malls, public libraries and hastily established shelters. One cafe in downtown Pottstown gave about 15 free meals to people without power, encouraged them to plug in electronic devices and even let a few get a warm shower. "It's just kind of giving back to the community — there's no other purpose of this," said iCreate Cafe owner Ashraf Khalil. Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett said after an aerial survey of the storm's aftermath that crews put a priority on restoring electricity to hospitals and nursing homes, and to communications facilities and sewer plants. "This storm is in some respects as bad or maybe even worse than Hurricane Sandy," he said during an appearance in the Philadelphia suburbs. He said a shipment of electrical generators from the federal government was on its way to Pennsylvania. He said he was urging electric utilities "to move as fast as they can, but they have to do it within the parameters of safety." Peco, the dominant electricity provider in the Philadelphia area, had the most outages with 423,000. Peco spokeswoman Debra Yemenijian most would have their lights back on by Friday night, but she said some could be without power until Sunday. About 200 people took advantage of seven shelters in three suburban Philadelphia counties, according to the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania. Shelters also were open in central Pennsylvania. The Northeast's second winter storm of the week dumped more than a foot of snow in some places on Wednesday, forcing schools, businesses and government offices to close, snarling air travel and sending cars and trucks sliding on slippery roads and highways. What made this one stand out was the thick coating of ice it left on trees and power lines. "Many of them already had a coating of snow on them," said Mark Durbin, a spokesman for the utility FirstEnergy. "It's that weight that crushes our equipment. Multiply that by hundreds of locations." In hard-hit York County, south of Harrisburg, the downed trees and lines kept emergency officials busy. Calls to 911 on Wednesday were quadruple the normal volume, said Carl Lindquist, a spokesman for the county government. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission said that about 491,000 customers remained without power as of noon Thursday, down by several hundred thousand from a day earlier. After Peco, FirstEnergy had about 49,000 outages in central Pennsylvania and PPL had 19,000 in northeastern Pennsylvania. Some 69,000 Maryland power customers were in the dark, along with about 3,000 in New Jersey and 1,000 in northern Delaware. Corbett said utility companies were still ramping up their response and expected to have about 5,000 people working to reconnect customers. Thursday saw the lower 48 states record what is likely to be their lowest average temperature of the season, just 11 degrees. Forecasters said it would remain chilly through the weekend in the mid-Atlantic, with daytime highs around freezing and overnight lows in the teens. Light snow was expected over the weekend. Officials pleaded with people not to use generators or gas grills indoors after 20 to 25 people in the Philadelphia area were taken to hospitals with carbon monoxide poisoning. Several hospitals were running on backup generators. Most decided to cancel elective surgeries and out-patient testing.

Associated Press writers Marc Levy and Mark Scolforo in Harrisburg, Kevin Begos in Pittsburgh, and Ron Todt, Maryclaire Dale and Matt Moore in Philadelphia contributed to this report.

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