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December 20, 2014

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2008 Elections

Republicans on Yucca Mountain

John McCain (has secured nomination)
John McCain has been consistent in his support for storing nuclear waste within Yucca Mountain. He has said publicly that tough decisions regarding nuclear waste have to be made and that storing nuclear waste over many different states is a larger national threat than storing all the waste at Yucca Mountain. He supports going forward with building more nuclear power plants and believes storing waste inside Yucca Mountain will streamline that cause. . . . more | Other issues | Bio

 

Ron Paul
Ron Paul is the only Republican candidate to take a firm stance against using Yucca Mountain as a nuclear waste repository. He believes the issue to be about states’ rights and does not approve of the federal government deciding such matters. In May 2006, he voted to prohibit funding toward a “Yucca Mountain Youth Zone” Web site. The site featured games and activities promoting Yucca Mountain as a safe repository for nuclear waste. . . . more | Other issues | Bio

 

Alan Keyes
In 2000, Alan Keyes completed a survey given to then-presidential candidates by the Washington-based Sustainable Energy Coalition. Keyes responded that he supports establishing a high-level nuclear waste facility at Yucca Mountain. Additionally, Keyes noted support for new plant construction, as well as the relicensing of existing plants, but “not as a mandatory requirement [and] provided the nuclear plants are not built with tax dollars.” Regarding a proposed plan to recycle radioactive waste from nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants into consumer products, Keyes voiced support. “These metals have no more radioactivity than the background environment, and hence pose no human health risk,” he said. “Allowing private companies to acquire these materials would save the U.S. Treasury and the American taxpayer half a billion dollars in avoided disposal costs.” ... more | Other issues | Bio

 

Rudy Giuliani (dropped out)
As the former mayor of New York City, Rudy Giuliani has not had a chance to vote on any issues related to Yucca Mountain. However, he did seek and obtain the endorsement of former Gov. Bob List, a noted nuclear industry lobbyist who vocally supports the use of Yucca Mountain as a nuclear waste repository. Aside from this political connection, Giuliani has not taken a firm stance on the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Furthermore, Giuliani has also received the endorsement of U.S. Rep. Jon Porter, R-Nev. Porter is against using Yucca Mountain to house nuclear waste. . . . more | Other issues | Bio

 

Mike Huckabee (dropped out)
While Mike Huckabee has not taken a firm stance on whether Yucca Mountain should be used to house nuclear waste, he has gone on record supporting the expansion of nuclear power in the United States. In an interview with Grist.org, Huckabee said he believes the country has an unfounded bias against nuclear energy. He cited France as a country not known for risky behavior yet friendly enough toward nuclear power to become an almost completely nuclear country. He acknowledged that nuclear waste storage is “the sticky part.” He said that the American public should be educated that nuclear byproducts can be safely disposed.. . . more | Other issues | Bio

 

Duncan Hunter (dropped out)
In May 2006, Duncan Hunter voted against prohibiting the funding of “Yucca Mountain Youth Zone.” The pro-Yucca Mountain Web site builders and opponents of the proposal to ban funding claimed that children would access the website in order to find information for term papers and other classroom papers regarding nuclear power. Those against the Yucca Mountain Youth Zone claimed the Web site was nothing more than Bush administration propaganda attempting to make high level nuclear waste fun with games and activities that ignored potential accidents. Voting “no” on the proposal has been seen as a pro-Yucca Mountain stance. . . . more | Other issues | Bio

 

Mitt Romney (dropped out)
Mitt Romney has not taken a firm stance on Yucca Mountain. During his first campaign visit to Las Vegas in August, Romney said he understands that Nevadans have a lot to say on the issue and would never do anything to put these citizens in harm’s way. He said he would have to look at all available data regarding the plan to store nuclear waste in the mountain before making a decision. Former Nevada Gov. Kenny Guinn, an adamant opponent of the Yucca Mountain project, is endorsing Romney. . . . more | Other issues | Bio

 

Tom Tancredo (dropped out) In May 2006, Tom Tancredo voted against prohibiting the funding of “Yucca Mountain Youth Zone.” The pro-Yucca Mountain Web site builders and opponents of the proposal to ban funding claimed that children would access the website in order to find information for term papers and other classroom papers regarding nuclear power. Those against the Yucca Mountain Youth Zone claimed the Web site was nothing more than Bush administration propaganda attempting to make high level nuclear waste fun with games and activities that ignored potential accidents. . . . more | Other issues | Bio

 

Fred Thompson (dropped out)
In 1997, former Tennessee Senator Fred Thompson voted yes to approve a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. A “yes” vote authorized the president to use his sole and unreviewable discretion to determine the suitability of the site. Since then, Thompson has not commented on his support of the Yucca Mountain project. He has said that he has always been an advocate of nuclear power. Thompson worked for more than 20 years as a lobbyist. During this time, he lobbied for an experimental reactor. The project to build the reactor was canceled after the government had spent $1.7 billion. . . more | Other issues | Bio

 

— Las Vegas Sun new media managing editor Dave Toplikar and new media interns April Corbin and Jenna Kohler compiled this report.

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