Las Vegas Sun

July 19, 2019

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Coroner: All 58 Las Vegas shooting victims identified

John Fudenberg

Mikayla Whitmore

Clark County Coroner John Fudenberg speaks to members of the media during a press briefing in Las Vegas, Nev. on October 5, 2017.

Updated Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 | 3:16 p.m.

Family Assistance Press Briefing

President & CEO of the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority Rossi Ralenkotter speaks to members of the media during a press briefing in Las Vegas, Nev. on October 5, 2017.  The briefing was held to discuss the efforts various agencies have been conducting to provide comfort and assistance to the victims and their families involved in the mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest festival this past Sunday. Launch slideshow »

All 58 people killed in Sunday’s mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip have been identified, and their names will be made public later today, Clark County Coroner John Fudenberg said.

Most of the victims died from gunshot wounds, officials said. The process of releasing the bodies to the next of kin is underway, Fudenberg said.

To make arrangements, family members can call the Coroner’s Office at 702-455-4281 until 6 p.m. today; starting tomorrow, the hotline will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Speaking at a news conference with other local officials, Clark County Commissioner Steve Sisolak said a GoFundMe account to help victims and their families has netted about $9.5 million. He said he expected donations to climb to the tens of millions of dollars.

Rossi Ralenkotter, president and CEO of the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, said it was too early to talk about the impact of the shooting on tourism.

A gunman opened fire Sunday night from the 32nd floor of Mandalay Bay onto a country music festival, where, besides the fatalities, nearly 500 people were injured.

“There’s going to be a time when we go back to promoting Las Vegas as the greatest destination in the world, but that’s not now,” he said.

“We need to take care of this. We need to take care of our customers. We need to take care of the community itself, and that’s what we’ll be doing,” Ralenkotter said.