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February 23, 2017

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sense

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March 21, 2010

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Total Comments: 7 (view all)

Instead of paying fines, maybe the jaywalkers should get a community service sentence of manning the crosswalks and helping protect their own children and neighborhood children in the school crossing zones for a few weeks. They might see how many people ignore the speed limits and crosswalks entirely and how maybe they are teaching their kids that jaywalking is ok is making them even more unsafe in an already unsafe situation. People honk at kids in the crosswalks, speed up as soon as they collect their own kids, double and triple park, and then no one can see kids walking out between cars. If the NAACP wants to do something constructive for the particular neighborhood, they could start by being out there in the school zones every day for a few weeks encouraging drivers to slow down and observe some slowdown and courtesy driving habits. They could try forming a useful safety net for the kids. Set a good example for action instead of whining when authorities try to follow up on longstanding safety procedures already in place .

(Suggest removal) 9/2/10 at 9:36 p.m.

Don't wonder what will happen if they would mandate a number of students per district. Its easy to figure. That would be the first thing to go if districts ran into financial difficulties. The state set class size limits some time back so our children would not be sitting in overcrowded, understaffed classrooms, and that has fallen by the wayside whenever there have been any hint of financial issues.
Until parents get seriously involved and demand classroom level, visible improvements that have more to do with their child's daily contact with the educational system, and continue from there to see that they as parents are responsible for requiring the state to spend their funds wisely for education, little will change, no matter what size each district is.
Urban district, rural district, private school, charter school or homeschool...success comes from those involved taking responsibility. Wherever you came from, a group was or was not committed to the education of the community's children.
Regardless of the economy, Nevada's and Clark County School's educational programs rank poorly because we don't value education highly enough to do what is necessary to make it work here. Those responsible include the students, school personnel, parents, AND Nevada taxpayers, businesses, organizations and elected officials who expect to live in an environment that values educated and productive citizens.
It does take funds, and we have never spent generously and wisely on education in Nevada. Everyone decides it is not their responsibility after all, and that it was a bad year for business, and our "Education Politicians" weasel out every time on the reality of approaching taxpayers for education funding even in good years!
Quibbling over whether the ranking is actually 50th or not quite...? Pretty much avoiding the real issue of doing something about it.

(Suggest removal) 6/16/10 at 11:45 p.m.

Magnet schools in this school district in the middle and high school levels do not accept every student who wishes to attend. They must apply and be recommended. If they have behavior issues after they are accepted, they will find they are not necessarily there for further years. If they are motivated to behave and to be there in the first place, it stands to reason they just might apply themselves a bit more to their homework and to pay attention and not cause disruption in class. Could that be part of the reason they are forming a student body that is more successful in general? DUH. I would guess test scores, grades, attendance and graduation rates are higher in magnet schools for sure without having to wonder at an explanation at all. When a student has chosen to be somewhere, rather than just shown up because it was the path of least resistance, results are bound to be a little better.

(Suggest removal) 5/24/10 at 7:42 p.m.

Congratulations to those teachers who invested in the extra leadership courses. Merit pay, raises for demonstrated increases in production, is possible in sales and factory work where bottom line is tied to factors that can be controlled at the input level. Public schools have no control over the raw materials (student abilities and potentials) that walk in the door. While some variances in learning abilities seem to be accounted for with special education, there are many backgrounds, attitudes, personalities, parental and cultural factors that affect what and how students learn the set amounts that would have to be measured for merit pay to be implemented. If merit pay is instituted, there would soon be schools where NO ONE would teach without some system of subsidized bonuses, because of factors outside the teachers' control would impact successful outcome.

(Suggest removal) 5/16/10 at 9:29 a.m.

I have donated for years, never dreaming the firemen were on taxpayers' time instead of giving their own time. ABSOLUTELY BAD POLICY IF THIS IS INDEED WHAT IS HAPPENING. I am sure many firemen give freely of their time for many causes and would not accuse them of being selfish in any way. But they should not be using taxpayer paid time any more than any other group of or individual taxpayer paid employees should to raise funds for their own favorite charities.
But if this is indeed an acceptable ethic in the Vegas Valley, it could solve some problems.
Maybe the schoolteachers, custodians, administrators, paraprofessionals, etc, should leave school for a day each week and set up at the school crossings to raise cash to keep the schools running...they could just take all the kids with them and call it a math lesson.
Possibly the police have a favorite charity and could use each traffic stop or crime scene to collect from individuals involved...as long as they are there anyway. It might deter some speeders and others from getting involved at all.
Each government entity would need to decide on the charity favorite though, which might be difficult, knowing how government groups work.

(Suggest removal) 4/4/10 at 5:16 p.m.

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