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November 21, 2019

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Plane makes emergency landing on Henderson street

emergency landing on Volunteer Boulevard

Christopher DeVargas

An Extra 330 Aerobatic Aircraft suffers major damage after an emergency landing on Volunteer Boulevard, a road just south of the Henderson Executive Airport, Wednesday Nov. 5, 2014. The 2 passengers on board escaped with out injury.

Updated Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014 | 4:44 p.m.

emergency landing on Volunteer Boulevard

An Extra 330 Aerobatic Aircraft suffers major damage after an emergency landing on Volunteer Boulevard, a road just south of the Henderson Executive Airport, Wednesday Nov. 5, 2014. The 2 passengers on board escaped with out injury. Launch slideshow »

A plane operated by a company that lets customers engage in mock dogfights made an emergency landing on a Henderson street today after possibly experiencing a mechanical problem, officials said.

The Extra 330 LC plane was carrying two people when it landed on Volunteer Boulevard, stopping at the southern perimeter fence of Henderson Executive Airport, said Christine Crews, a spokeswoman for the Clark County Department of Aviation.

Nobody was hurt, but the aircraft sustained major damage, Crews said.

The plane, operated by Sky Combat Ace, took off from the airport at 11:15 a.m., according to a statement from the company. At about 11:40 a.m., air traffic controllers reported the pilot had declared an emergency and had to land.

City of Henderson spokeswoman Kathleen Richards said the aircraft may have had a mechanical issue but the cause of the problem would be determined by the National Transportation Safety Board.

On idle power, the plane was able to glide and descend for about two miles before landing about a quarter mile short of the airport runway, the company said. Henderson police and firefighters responded.

There was one Sky Combat Ace employee and one passenger on board, the company statement said.

Sky Combat Ace allows customers to engage in aerial dogfights and maneuver the aircraft once they reach 6,000 feet, company spokeswoman Megan Fazio said. Customers are not involved in takeoffs or landings, she said.

Sky Combat Ace is working with the Federal Aviation Administration and the NTSB to determine the cause of the incident, the company said.

In more than three years of operations and with in excess of 14,000 customer flights, Sky Combat Ace has not had an aircraft accident, the company said. Its pilots are trained for emergency landings, the statement said.

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