Las Vegas Sun

December 5, 2016

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Opinion

Editorials »

Want to see the puck drop? Better leave your house early
While other cities have modernized their transportation systems with light-rail, Las Vegas has chosen to stay stuck in a car-is-king mindset straight out of the days of tailfins and rotary phones. It’s way past time to break out of that regressive straitjacket ...
In age of social media, fake news is becoming a real problem
Two weeks before the election, listeners of the National Public Radio program “This American Life” got a chilling look at the perverse power of alt-right misinformation campaigns. The program that week focused on ...

Columnists »

Where I Stand »

Letters to the Editor

E-mail your submission. Letters to the editor should be no more than 250 words and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be printed.

Don’t write off populous states
The distinct advantage of a national popular vote versus the Electoral College is that candidates would have to …
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By Cesar Lumba, Las Vegas
Backing Clinton was right move
Donald Trump’s insensitivity and morals do not represent the people I know and respect …
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By Jo Ann Malkin, Las Vegas
Use funds from VW to aid police
How should Nevada spend its part of Volkswagen settlement?
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By Ann Turnbull, Henderson
Heller should oppose nominees
Nevada Sen. Dean Heller will soon have to decide where he stands on these and other nominees. Nevadans are by turns liberal and libertarian but share concern for …
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By Jeff Schauer, Las Vegas
Trump needs help maintaining lies
Donald Trump is the quintessential politician who, testing which way the winds are blowing, will offer what his constituency wants to hear. It is the way he was elected; he made promises he couldn’t or wouldn’t …
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By John Esperian, Las Vegas
Circus coming to the White House
The subject became more whimsical as I suggested that perhaps the greatest showman of all time, P.T. Barnum, could become president. We imagined him appointing the clowns to his Cabinet; the acrobats would head the various agencies and the ring master would be the …
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By Michael Plaisted, Las Vegas
President can’t also be CEO
When he negotiates a trade deal with a country his business has holdings in or wants to move into, who does the negotiating? Is it the president of the United States or the CEO of his family business? There couldn’t possibly be a …
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By Frank Dase, Las Vegas
Dissecting Clinton’s votes
Hillary Clinton won the popular vote, but if you look at it by square miles won, she maybe got 10 to 15 percent of the country ...
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By Mal Telloian, North Las Vegas
The more things change …
Uttered decades ago: “My parents told me that anybody can become president. I’m starting to believe it!” — Clarence Darrow ...
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By Robert Lepore, Las Vegas
Look out: Here comes inflation
Trump’s tax plan is to reduce taxes on most Americans. The major tax break goes to the top income levels. This increases the money in people’s pockets ...
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By John Pauli, Las Vegas

Other Voices »

  • Democrats must mend fences but can’t abandon their core
    Democrats are in danger of moving from complacency to panic. Neither is particularly helpful ...
  • Forget about ‘identity politics’; think instead about ‘coalition’
    Should political candidates appeal to particular racial, ethnic or gender groups? Or should they broaden their message to appeal to all groups? Such are the questions that presidential campaigns ask themselves in the circular firing squad of blame and finger-pointing that follow a big loss ...
  • Infrastructure spending stimulates boondoggles, not economy
    History has a sly sense of humor. It caused an epiphany regarding infrastructure projects — roads, harbors, airports, etc. — to occur on a bridge over Boston’s Charles River, hard by Harvard Yard, where rarely is heard a discouraging word about government ...
  • By declining to answer, pope raises more questions
    “This is not normal” — so say Donald Trump’s critics as he prepares to assume the presidency. But the U.S. republic is only the second-oldest institution facing a distinctively unusual situation at the moment. Pride of place goes to the Roman Catholic Church, which with less fanfare (perhaps because the papacy lacks a nuclear arsenal) has also entered terra incognita ...
  • Going forward, Democrats must look beyond populism
    Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by more than 2 million, and she would probably be president-elect if the director of the FBI hadn’t laid such a heavy thumb on the scales, just days before the election. But it shouldn’t even have been close; what put Donald Trump in striking distance was overwhelming support from whites without college degrees. So what can Democrats do to win back at least some of those voters?
  • Trump’s actions may push public to bend the arc toward more justice
    Maybe this much is true. Donald Trump, pseudo-president-elect, loser of the real election, charismatic stump-speech populist whose actual ability to govern may well be non-existent, has inflicted significant damage on America’s political infrastructure ...
  • Will Trump set his own path or be a bigger ‘Little Marco’?
    Republican economic policy doesn’t have a good recent track record. The past two Republican presidents left office deeply unpopular, thanks to recessions. Ronald Reagan’s record was much better, but still not as good as Bill Clinton’s ...
  • No, Trump, we can’t just get along
    You don’t get a pat on the back for ratcheting down from rabid after exploiting that very radicalism to your advantage. Unrepentant opportunism belies a staggering lack of character and caring that can’t simply be vanquished from memory. You did real harm to this country and many of its citizens, and I will never …
  • The Trump revelations
    Politicians lie; Donald Trump dissembles more frequently than most. So no matter how clever or tough or eloquent your questions, there are limits to
  • At lunch, Trump gives critics hope
    There are many decisions that President-elect Trump can and will make during the next four years. Many of them could be reversible by his successor. But there is one decision he can make that could have truly irreversible implications, and that is to abandon America’s commitment to …
  • Programs that offer alternative to incarceration would benefit mothers in prison and society
    Of America’s various policy missteps in my lifetime, perhaps the most catastrophic was mass incarceration. It has had devastating consequences for families, and it costs the average U.S. household $600 a year. The U.S. has recently come to its senses and begun dialing back on the number of male prisoners. But we have continued to increase the number of women behind bars; two-thirds of women in …
  • Fidel Castro’s legacy is a failed utopia
    During the 1930s, there were many apologists for Josef Stalin’s brutalities, which he committed in the name of building a workers’ paradise fit for an improved humanity. The apologists complacently said, “You can’t make an omelet without breaking eggs.” To which George Orwell acidly replied: “Where’s the omelet?” With Castro, the problem …
  • Trump’s best move would be making Romney secretary of state
    Thanks in part to the president-elect’s predilection for outbursts of fewer than 140 characters, he routinely comes across as petty and mercurial. But right now he has an opportunity for the opposite impression. He can choose Mitt Romney …
  • Trump’s support of Cuba deal is best for all involved
    For half a century, the Castros cited the U.S.-imposed trade embargo, the travel ban for U.S. citizens and other such measures as “proof” that the Cuban revolution was under sustained attack by the United States. From my experience — I’ve made 10 trips to Cuba and written a book about the place — most Cubans are not gullible; they see their government for what it is. But they are …
  • Criminal justice reforms should remain priority for new administration
    Barack Obama’s White House and Justice Department have prioritized reducing excessive penalties for drug offenses, easing re-entry for people leaving imprisonment and rooting out racial disparity in the criminal justice system. During the final three years of his administration, the federal prison population has …