Las Vegas Sun

October 24, 2014

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The Sun’s 2014 election endorsements
The Sun offers its endorsements of candidates and makes recommendations on the ballot questions for this year’s election. All terms are four years unless otherwise noted.
Endorsements on the judges
Voters this year have several judicial elections to consider. These can be difficult choices for voters because as a rule, the public doesn’t track judicial decisions and legal issues, so voters can be hard-pressed in knowing who the best judges are. Let us help you. Here are the Sun’s endorsements for District and Family Court races in Clark County.

Columnists »

Where I Stand »

Letters to the Editor

E-mail your submission. Letters to the editor should be no more than 250 words and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be printed.

Ideology of the Dark Ages
I am responding to the Oct. 11 column “Incomplete caricature of Islam” by Nicholas Kristof, a columnist for The New York Times.
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By Bill Fennell, Las Vegas
Oncologists against margin tax
On behalf of the Nevada Oncology Society, I want to express my concern with the statewide Ballot Question 3, referred to as “The Margin Tax Initiative” or “The Education Initiative.” Nevada Oncology Society is a nonprofit organization representing medical oncologists, surgical oncologists and other oncology specialists who provide cancer care in Nevada.
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By Hamidreza Sanatinia, Rockville, Md.
Media can best protect reporters
In response to Caroline Little’s Other Voices of Oct. 10 (“It’s time to protect journalists who risk their lives to report the news”), the media themselves have the means by which to best protect journalists operating in war zones.
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By Graham H. Tye, North Las Vegas
Who will Cegavske represent?
I viewed with interest the article on the secretary of state race in the Oct. 12 issue of the Sun. One important overlooked fact is that candidate Barbara Cegavske serves on the board of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) and is state chair for that organization.
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By Gil Eisner, Las Vegas
Memorial walls for exposed employees
After coming home tonight from a local casino with the stench of nicotine clinging to me, I have come up with an idea for casinos that refuse to change to a nonsmoking environment for the safety of their patrons and, more importantly, their employees.
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By Sandra Hanson, Las Vegas
Consider a margin tax scenario
The proposed 2 percent gross margin business tax will hurt Nevada greatly. Here’s how.
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By Bob Darling, Henderson
Ulterior motives for blaming police
I must say I found the behavior of always blaming the police and taking the side of criminals a bit curious, but finally the pattern has emerged and it has become crystal clear.
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By David Baker, Las Vegas
No reasonable alternative offered
Millions of dollars are being spent to influence Nevada voters on the education initiative. Intelligent people can disagree on issues like taxes and education spending, but some things are facts.
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By Jeremy Christensen, Las Vegas
Crime pays for Hamas terrorists
Wow, $5.4 billion to a terrorist organization! If this doesn’t incentivize Hamas to continue its war on Israel, nothing will.
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By Jerry Fink, Las Vegas
Let developers pay for soccer stadium
If this soccer stadium that Cordish Companies and Findlay Sports want to build is such a great deal, why don’t they try to hustle one of the billionaires here in town?
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By Michael Kerzetski, Las Vegas

Other Voices »

  • Sen. Warren makes the case
    Sen. Elizabeth Warren says she isn’t running for president. At this rate, however, she may have to.
  • What energy crisis?
    There is something extraordinary happening on Main Street, in the suburban strips and at country stores: Workers are lowering the prices on the signs for gasoline.
  • How to restart health care reform
    Midterm elections are coming, and both parties are lobbing grenades about health care. Despite the furious rhetoric, the two sides are more alike than they realize. Both spent decades pursuing policies that obstruct health care’s capacity to save lives, ease suffering and cut costs. The endless vitriol resembles World War I-style trench warfare. The 2010 Affordable Care Act moved the battle lines a little in one direction; the midterms that year moved them a little in the opposite direction. With divided government, the 2014 elections will move the lines even less.
  • No faith in our government
    I promised myself I wouldn’t do it, but I did: While flying from D.C. to Dallas recently, just after the news came out that an Ebola-infected nurse had been allowed to fly while running a fever, I went back and read the opening pages of Stephen King’s “The Stand.”
  • Hearing, listening and marriage
    Here’s what I’ve learned in 23 years of marriage: Love isn’t blind, but it can be hard of hearing.
  • As aggression rises, it’s time to examine policing
    Today, electronic eyes are everywhere, and the once-submerged issue of encounters between police and black men is coming into public view. It’s creating increasing tensions between blacks — regardless of their income and professional status — and police who have muscled up to fight everything from seat-belt violations to terrorism.
  • Failures of competence
    For years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been the most trusted agency in the federal government. The CDC has seen the country through SARS and the swine flu virus. The general perception was not only did it do important, apolitical work, but it was highly competent. And then came Ebola.
  • Should Israel withdraw from West Bank?
    Sixty years ago Algerians revolted against the French who had ruled them for more than 120 years. On Nov. 1, 1954, the National Liberation Front (FLN), the leading Algerian underground, issued a proclamation calling upon the French government to enter negotiations, which eventually would lead to the creation of an independent Algeria.
  • No shock and no awe
    It’s not too soon to state the obvious: At this point, the war against the Islamic State can only be seen as failing.
  • Tackled by the language police
    Wretched excess by government can be beneficial if it startles people into wholesome disgust and deepened distrust and prompts judicial rebukes that enlarge freedom. So let’s hope the Federal Communications Commission embraces the formal petition inciting it to deny licenses to broadcasters who use the word “Redskins” when reporting on the Washington Redskins.
  • When government was good
    Tom Wolf’s mood is sunny but his words are serious. He’s answering teachers’ questions at an elementary school featured last year in a New York Times story about the costs of overcrowding and underinvestment.
  • A daughter’s sense of duty
    When friends heard I was in Michigan to help my elderly, macular-degenerated, moderately demented mother who had fractured her hip and been moved to a rehab facility, they told me not to forget to take care of myself. I’ve given other caregivers the identical advice. But now, after several weeks here, I wonder what it even means. How does it translate into reality?
  • Problem with delving into politicians’ personal lives
    Gary Hart’s downfall in the run-up to the 1988 presidential election marked an important milestone on a journalistic arc that began with Watergate. Where, previously, the media fast track was greased by befriending politicians, now it was enhanced by bringing them down. Ever since, nothing has been out of bounds for media outlets large and small. Consider Kansas.
  • Three key questions for the GOP
    Officially, not a single candidate is running for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination.
  • Amazon plays rough, but what will we do about it?
    Is Amazon a monopoly? That certainly is what Franklin Foer, the editor of The New Republic, thinks. In the magazine’s current issue, he has written a lengthy polemic denouncing the company for all manner of sins. The headline reads: “Amazon Must Be Stopped.”