Las Vegas Sun

April 20, 2014

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Bundy is no victor
Bunkerville rancher defied the rule of law, picking and choosing what he’d obey
In the aftermath of the standoff in Bunkerville between the Bureau of Land Management and rancher Cliven Bundy, Bundy and his supporters declared victory.
Mulroy’s water expertise won’t go down the drain
A rock star in the world of water policy has come out of retirement to focus on what the nation will need to react to climate change in the coming generations ...
Letters to the Editor

E-mail your submission. Letters to the editor should be no more than 250 words and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be printed.

Feds are trying to ruin rancher
God bless Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval and Sen. Dean Heller for questioning the zeal with which the Bureau of Land Management is trying to put rancher Cliven Bundy and his family into the poorhouse.
Continues…
By Joseph DuPont, Towanda, Pa.
Wrong to weaken Clinton forest plan
It was nearly 20 years ago that President Bill Clinton’s Northwest Forest Plan went into effect. Government agency reviews show the plan has been effective at protecting drinking water supplies for millions of Americans, improving water quality, and restoring forests that were affected by decades of unsustainable old-growth logging.
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By Dr. George Fenwick, Washington, D.C.
Our young people and a TV blunder
One would hope the college student who pronounced “Achilles” as “A-chill-is” on a recent college edition of “Wheel of Fortune” is not representative of today’s college students.
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By Charles Berberian, Las Vegas
Minimum wage not high enough
I believe that minimum wage should be increased in order for people to be able to simply live. I work in the service industry, and I must depend on tips to get by. Working 40 hours a week is still not cutting it.
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By Sam Castillo, Las Vegas
‘Patriots’ defend a rich tax dodger
I am frustrated by the so-called patriots who rallied to defend a tax dodger — a rich one, no less.
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By Frank Hackett, Taylor, Mich.
Economic growth is at capacity
In his April 8 column “A tax reformer’s uphill push,” George Will referred to an economic growth rate of 4 percent per year. That shows that Will has no understanding of high school math.
Continues…
By Jason G. Brent, Las Vegas
President wrong on GOP and voting
In a speech April 11, President Barack Obama spent a good part of the time chastising Republicans for limiting voting access to millions of blacks and minorities.
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By Clarence Lanzrath, Las Vegas
We lie to our kids about marijuana
I’m writing about Jackie Valley’s story in The Sunday: “Modern addiction: Our heroin epidemic.”
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By Kirk Muse, Mesa, Ariz.
Lawmakers get paid to do nothing
Well, here we go again. After all the hard work it did, the House is in recess. Lawmakers can go back to their gerrymandered districts and collect money to get re-elected to go back to Washington and do more nothing.
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By Bruce Karley, Las Vegas
Bundy’s win sends the wrong message
It is time for Nevada to man up and uphold the laws of the land. Since when did America start negotiating with terrorists? Cliven Bundy has blatantly broken the law and, even in the face of compromise, could not show humility or respect.
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By Greta Hyland, Dammeron Valley, Utah

Other Voices »

  • Give aging Navy ships to our allies
    A bitter debate has raged in the Pentagon for several months about the wisdom of taking the nuclear aircraft carrier George Washington out of service to save money. The Washington, at 24 years old a relatively young vessel, is due for a costly refit, a routine procedure that all of the 11 large carriers in service undergo regularly.
  • Immigration and drug laws can go too far
    The soldier who fights for his country only to be rewarded with indifference or even outright mistreatment when he returns is a story familiar in fiction and sometimes, unfortunately, in real life as well.
  • Obamacare news you probably missed
    Did you hear the latest news about Obamacare? Probably not, even though it is important news you need to know so you can make smart decisions that will help you and your family.
  • Preserving my marriage
    Communication was key when deciding to try to break into medical marijuana business ...
  • Faculty’s role in controlling tuition
    Are university faculty members doing their part to control the tuition costs that students are required to pay to pursue university education? Students are the reason for the existence of faculty in our colleges and universities. It is common knowledge that the tuition costs are steadily climbing at a higher clip than the rate of inflation.
  • A wit for all seasons
    I don’t remember much about being on Stephen Colbert’s show. It all passed in a blur of fear.
  • A lesson from a Fort Hood victim
    When President Barack Obama and the first lady made a return visit to Fort Hood last week, they paused in front of the kind of memorials we have become accustomed to seeing since the start of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.
  • Our soldiers don’t deserve to return to this
    The only reason he is alive, Mike Yurchison says, is his girlfriend, Leigh Anna Landsberger. She sits with him through endless waits at Veterans Affairs, whispering that he’s smarter than she is even if his brain is damaged. She helps him through his seizures, and she nags him to overcome drug addiction.
  • Women’s unequal lot in life
    I dropped in on my sister last week. As usual, I was amazed. I work a single job; she works three or four. There’s her paid one at an executive search firm, finding and screening candidates for corner offices in the retail industry. Then there are the others.
  • Israelites and a long obedience
    Monday night was the start of Passover, the period when Jews celebrate the liberation of the Israelites from slavery into freedom.
  • Has GM pulled a Pinto?
    In the late 1960s, a charismatic vice president at Ford Motor Co. decided to bring out a low-priced car that could be produced for little money while bringing in huge profits. The executive’s name was Lee Iacocca, and the Ford Pinto he championed became one of the most infamous models in U.S. automotive history. Why? Because to save money, Ford released a car that could explode in even low-speed rear-end collisions.
  • Go ahead, Vladimir, make my day
    So the latest news is that President Vladimir Putin of Russia has threatened to turn off gas supplies to Ukraine if Kiev doesn’t pay its overdue bill, and, by the way, Ukraine’s pipelines are the transit route for 15 percent of gas consumption for Europe. If I’m actually rooting for Putin to go ahead and shut off the gas, does that make me a bad guy?
  • The oldest hatred, forever young
    Most of the hate crimes in the United States don’t take the fatal form that the shootings in Kansas over the weekend did, and most aren’t perpetrated by villains as bloated with rage and blinded by conspiracy theories as the person accused in this case, Frazier Glenn Miller. He’s an extreme, not an emblem.
  • CEO pay goes up, up and away!
    At 79, Graef “Bud” Crystal is the grand old man of executive compensation critics. Once a top compensation consultant, he switched sides in the 1980s, becoming a fierce critic of many of the practices he helped institutionalize and analyzing executive pay for other media such as Fortune and, most recently, Bloomberg News. He’s been known to call his second career “atoning for my sins.”
  • The boundaries of Boston Strong
    The 118th Boston Marathon, next week, will actually be the first of its kind — the first running of the iconic American foot race after two bombers killed three people, injured 263 (many horribly) and shook the nation a year ago.